Tips & Techniques
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Marry Your Flowers and Veggies: Companion Planting Guide to Your Garden

Gardening

By Linda Ly

Gardeners know that a diverse mix of plants, from annuals and perennials to flowers and vegetables, makes for a healthier garden. But did you know that the right (or wrong) combination of certain plants could actually make them more (or less) productive? The process is known as companion planting, and it’s believed that growing these plants in close proximity may help deter pests, promote growth, and even improve flavor—or on the opposite end of the spectrum, stunt each other’s growth. Learn which flowers and veggies work well together, and which ones should be planted far from one another.

Companion Planting Chart

Type of Vegetable Friends Enemies Special Notes
Beans
Beets, carrots, chard, cabbage, corn, cucumbers, peas, radishes Garlic, onions Nasturtiums and rosemary deter bean beetles
Cabbage
Beets, celery, chard, lettuce, spinach, onions Kohlrabi, tomatoes Hyssop, mint, and sage deter cabbage moths
Carrots
Beans, lettuce, onions, peas, peppers, tomatoes Dill Chives improve flavor, rosemary deters carrot flies
Onions
Cabbage, carrots, chard, lettuce, peppers, tomatoes Beans, peas Chamomile improves growth and flavor
Radishes
Beans, carrots, cucumbers, lettuce, melons, peas Hyssop Nasturtiums improve growth and flavor
Tomatoes
Asparagus, carrots, celery, onions, parsley, peppers Corn, dill, kohlrabi, potatoes Basil, mint, and bee balm improve growth and flavor

Tips for Watering Companion Plants

When growing different varieties of plants side by side, try to group them together by water needs. Deep-rooted vegetables like tomatoes and asparagus should be placed in the same bed, as they’ll thrive with less frequent (but more thorough) watering that soaks deep into the soil. On the flip side, shallow- to medium-rooted plants like beans and chard benefit from more frequent watering that saturates just the first few inches of soil. Wind soaker hoses around your plants and attach them to dual outlet electronic timers to easily manage your watering schedule for different beds.

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